More Letters From Students In Support of Memorial Marker at Venice and Lincoln Blvds.

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Hello, my name is Wendy Santiago, and I am sixteen years old. I go to Venice High School, where I’m in the 11th grade. I’m in the New Media Academy, and I’m in Mrs. Hayashibara’s Honors U. S. History class. In Mrs. Hayashibara’s class, I have learned about the Japanese American Internment Camps, and I think that it was a travesty of justice. Now that I have learned all about the Japanese American Internment Camps, I would like you to support the Free Venice Beachhead’s memorial marker campaign for the North West corner of Venice and Lincoln, where many Japanese Americans were told to assemble in April 1942, after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, in 1941.
I think that you should support this because this will mean a lot for the Japanese American community. It will also show other people what loss of constitutional rights the Japanese American’s went through. I know that on February 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued the Executive Order 90066. This order made the Japanese Americans leave everything behind and go to a relocation camp. We hope that you will support the construction of a memorial marker for the Japanese Americans. Thank you for your time.
Sincerely, Wendy Santiago
_____
My name is Bryan Barrera, and I am a junior at Venice High School, part of the New Media Academy, in Ms. Hayashibara’s Honors U. S. History class. I am writing you this letter to gain your support towards a monument on the northeast corner of Lincoln and Venice Blvd. Under Executive Order 9066, Venetians of Japanese ancestry were forced to line up at this intersection of Venice and Lincoln Blvds. on April 24, 1942. They were then shipped to internment camps throughout the U.S. Japanese Americans were forced to leave behind their homes and most of their possessions to spend their days behind barbed wire in the internment camps.
Many had nowhere to go once they were released from the camps three years later and had to start new lives. Japanese Americans were deprived of their constitutional rights and deserve some sort of a memorial for their struggle. Please support the building of a memorial for the victims of the Japanese American internees.
Sincerely, Bryan Barrera
My name is Fernando Ayllon, and I am a junior enrolled at Venice High School. I am in the New Media Academy in Ms. Hayashibaras Honors U. S. history class. The purpose of this letter is to ask for your support to put up a monument or plaque on the northeast corner of Venice Blvd. and Lincoln Blvd. Venetians of Japanese ancestry were forced to line up at the intersections of Venice Blvd. and Lincoln Blvd. to comply with Executive Order 9066. From here, they were loaded onto buses and sent to assembly centers and internment camps all across the United States.
The Japanese Americans were forced to leave behind their homes and most of their possessions when headed to the camps. When they were released, many Japanese Americans had no place to go, and hard to begin new lives. So please support us in an effort to put up a monument for the Japanese American internees, who had lost their constitutional rights for three years.
Sincerely, Fernando Ayllon
______
My name is Carla Montes, a junior at Venice High School, enrolled in an Honors U.S. History Class. We discussed the issue of the Internment of people of Japanese ancestry after Pearl Harbor, and after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order No. 53, that the Japanese American residents of California, Oregon, and Washington were forced to leave their homes and go to unknown war Relocation Authority camps. With this notice, Venice Residents were told to gather at the North West corner of Venice and Lincoln, and board buses. In total, 120,000 Japanese “aliens and non-aliens” were relocated.
In support of the Free Venice Beachhead efforts to commemorate the event, I really would like for you to take notice of what the community really wishes. This truly would mean something for the Japanese American community members as well as raise awarness of this historical event. Thank you for your time and support.
Sincerely, Carla Montes-Carrillo
_____
My name is Adam Schemerhorn, and I am a part of Ms. Hayashibara’s Honors US History Class. Please consider constructing a memorial on the northwest corner of Lincoln and Venice to commemorate Japanese Americans that lined up there in 1942 in preparation for their wartime incarceration. This was the time when President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 which gave the military the power to evacuate the Japanese Americans in California, Oregon and Washington. The Japanese Americans were then taken to assembly centers and internment camps all over the western deserts. These internment camps were very poorly constructed, and weren’t ideal places to raise families. Some of the time inside the camps was secretly documented by Japanese Americans who still had theirs cameras. The Venice Community would like you to support the construction of a memorial for these Japanese Americans who lost much of their real property and all of their constitutional rights. I hope that you will support this cause.
Sincerely, Adam Schemerhorn
______
Hello, my name is Mike O’Dell, and I’m a junior in Ms. Hayashibara’s 4th period U.S. History class at Venice High School. I would like you to support the creation of a marker in remembrance of the Japanese Americans, who were interned during WWII. Because of executive Order 9066 Venice locals of Japanese decent were forced to assemble on the north east corner of Venice and Lincoln where they where put onto buses. From there they wore removed from the Venice community and relocated to assembly camps and then camps in the desert.
This action violated rights given to all citizens and residents by the Constitution of the United States, and nothing like it should ever happen again. In cooperation with the Venice Beachhead and perhaps the Japanese American National Museum, a memorial or marker should be placed on the north east corner of Venice and Lincoln, where people where put on busses. Such a marker would prevent people from forgetting about the events that took place in 1942 preventing Americans from repeating this kind of discriminatory action.
Sincerely, Mike O’Dell
_____
Hello, my name is Kathrin Covarrubias and I am in Ms. Hayashibara’s Honors U.S. History class, at Venice High School. I write this letter to ask you to help support the creation of a marker on the northwest corner of Venice and Lincoln in remembrance of the Japanese Americans of Venice who were interned during World War II. After Japan’s December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, in 1942 all remaining Japanese Americans in Washington, Oregon and California were forced to assemble on the northwest corner of Venice and Lincoln to be put in buses and then sent to assembly centers, and later internment camps. These internment camps were in locations that the general American public, at the time, was oblivious to.
The Japanese Americans had to leave their homes and were only allowed to take few of their belongings. All this violated the constitutional rights of the Japanese Americans. Such actions should never be taken again, not even for national security. To commemorate this injustice to the Japanese Americans, I hope that you will support the creation of the marker on the northwest corner of Venice and Lincoln.
Sincerely, Kathrin Covarrubias
______
My name is Luz Napoles, and I am a junior at Venice High School. I am in Mrs. Hayashibara’s Honors U.S. History. I am writing you this letter to ask you to support a commemorative marker at the northwest corner of Venice and Lincoln, where many Japanese Americans were rounded up, and later interned in camps out in the desert during War World II.
Many Americans were scared after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, so they rounded up all the Japanese Americans out of concern for domestic espionage or sabotage, all unfounded fears. Japanese Americans venetians were forced to assemble at the corner of Venice and Lincoln, with only whatever they could carry, and no electronics were allowed. They were told to get on a bus and later were sent to camps out far away from the cities. This whole thing violated the U.S. Constitutional rights of habeas corpus and due process.
Those actions should never have taken place, and we should never isolate people because of their race or ethnicity. I hope that you will support the creation of a marker on the Northwest corner of Venice and Lincoln.
Sincerely, Luz Maria Napoles
Hello, my name is Wendy Santiago, and I am sixteen years old. I go to Venice High School, where I’m in the 11th grade. I’m in the New Media Academy, and I’m in Mrs. Hayashibara’s Honors U. S. History class. In Mrs. Hayashibara’s class, I have learned about the Japanese American Internment Camps, and I think that it was a travesty of justice. Now that I have learned all about the Japanese American Internment Camps, I would like you to support the Free Venice Beachhead’s memorial marker campaign for the North West corner of Venice and Lincoln, where many Japanese Americans were told to assemble in April 1942, after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, in 1941.
I think that you should support this because this will mean a lot for the Japanese American community. It will also show other people what loss of constitutional rights the Japanese American’s went through. I know that on February 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued the Executive Order 90066. This order made the Japanese Americans leave everything behind and go to a relocation camp. We hope that you will support the construction of a memorial marker for the Japanese Americans. Thank you for your time.
Sincerely, Wendy Santiago
_____
My name is Bryan Barrera, and I am a junior at Venice High School, part of the New Media Academy, in Ms. Hayashibara’s Honors U. S. History class. I am writing you this letter to gain your support towards a monument on the northeast corner of Lincoln and Venice Blvd. Under Executive Order 9066, Venetians of Japanese ancestry were forced to line up at this intersection of Venice and Lincoln Blvds. on April 24, 1942. They were then shipped to internment camps throughout the U.S. Japanese Americans were forced to leave behind their homes and most of their possessions to spend their days behind barbed wire in the internment camps.
Many had nowhere to go once they were released from the camps three years later and had to start new lives. Japanese Americans were deprived of their constitutional rights and deserve some sort of a memorial for their struggle. Please support the building of a memorial for the victims of the Japanese American internees.
Sincerely, Bryan Barrera
My name is Fernando Ayllon, and I am a junior enrolled at Venice High School. I am in the New Media Academy in Ms. Hayashibaras Honors U. S. history class. The purpose of this letter is to ask for your support to put up a monument or plaque on the northeast corner of Venice Blvd. and Lincoln Blvd. Venetians of Japanese ancestry were forced to line up at the intersections of Venice Blvd. and Lincoln Blvd. to comply with Executive Order 9066. From here, they were loaded onto buses and sent to assembly centers and internment camps all across the United States.
The Japanese Americans were forced to leave behind their homes and most of their possessions when headed to the camps. When they were released, many Japanese Americans had no place to go, and hard to begin new lives. So please support us in an effort to put up a monument for the Japanese American internees, who had lost their constitutional rights for three years.
Sincerely, Fernando Ayllon
______
My name is Carla Montes, a junior at Venice High School, enrolled in an Honors U.S. History Class. We discussed the issue of the Internment of people of Japanese ancestry after Pearl Harbor, and after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order No. 53, that the Japanese American residents of California, Oregon, and Washington were forced to leave their homes and go to unknown war Relocation Authority camps. With this notice, Venice Residents were told to gather at the North West corner of Venice and Lincoln, and board buses. In total, 120,000 Japanese “aliens and non-aliens” were relocated.
In support of the Free Venice Beachhead efforts to commemorate the event, I really would like for you to take notice of what the community really wishes. This truly would mean something for the Japanese American community members as well as raise awarness of this historical event. Thank you for your time and support.
Sincerely, Carla Montes-Carrillo
_____
My name is Adam Schemerhorn, and I am a part of Ms. Hayashibara’s Honors US History Class. Please consider constructing a memorial on the northwest corner of Lincoln and Venice to commemorate Japanese Americans that lined up there in 1942 in preparation for their wartime incarceration. This was the time when President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 which gave the military the power to evacuate the Japanese Americans in California, Oregon and Washington. The Japanese Americans were then taken to assembly centers and internment camps all over the western deserts. These internment camps were very poorly constructed, and weren’t ideal places to raise families. Some of the time inside the camps was secretly documented by Japanese Americans who still had theirs cameras. The Venice Community would like you to support the construction of a memorial for these Japanese Americans who lost much of their real property and all of their constitutional rights. I hope that you will support this cause.
Sincerely, Adam Schemerhorn
______
Hello, my name is Mike O’Dell, and I’m a junior in Ms. Hayashibara’s 4th period U.S. History class at Venice High School. I would like you to support the creation of a marker in remembrance of the Japanese Americans, who were interned during WWII. Because of executive Order 9066 Venice locals of Japanese decent were forced to assemble on the north east corner of Venice and Lincoln where they where put onto buses. From there they wore removed from the Venice community and relocated to assembly camps and then camps in the desert.
This action violated rights given to all citizens and residents by the Constitution of the United States, and nothing like it should ever happen again. In cooperation with the Venice Beachhead and perhaps the Japanese American National Museum, a memorial or marker should be placed on the north east corner of Venice and Lincoln, where people where put on busses. Such a marker would prevent people from forgetting about the events that took place in 1942 preventing Americans from repeating this kind of discriminatory action.
Sincerely, Mike O’Dell
_____
Hello, my name is Kathrin Covarrubias and I am in Ms. Hayashibara’s Honors U.S. History class, at Venice High School. I write this letter to ask you to help support the creation of a marker on the northwest corner of Venice and Lincoln in remembrance of the Japanese Americans of Venice who were interned during World War II. After Japan’s December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, in 1942 all remaining Japanese Americans in Washington, Oregon and California were forced to assemble on the northwest corner of Venice and Lincoln to be put in buses and then sent to assembly centers, and later internment camps. These internment camps were in locations that the general American public, at the time, was oblivious to.
The Japanese Americans had to leave their homes and were only allowed to take few of their belongings. All this violated the constitutional rights of the Japanese Americans. Such actions should never be taken again, not even for national security. To commemorate this injustice to the Japanese Americans, I hope that you will support the creation of the marker on the northwest corner of Venice and Lincoln.
Sincerely, Kathrin Covarrubias
______
My name is Luz Napoles, and I am a junior at Venice High School. I am in Mrs. Hayashibara’s Honors U.S. History. I am writing you this letter to ask you to support a commemorative marker at the northwest corner of Venice and Lincoln, where many Japanese Americans were rounded up, and later interned in camps out in the desert during War World II.
Many Americans were scared after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, so they rounded up all the Japanese Americans out of concern for domestic espionage or sabotage, all unfounded fears. Japanese Americans venetians were forced to assemble at the corner of Venice and Lincoln, with only whatever they could carry, and no electronics were allowed. They were told to get on a bus and later were sent to camps out far away from the cities. This whole thing violated the U.S. Constitutional rights of habeas corpus and due process.
Those actions should never have taken place, and we should never isolate people because of their race or ethnicity. I hope that you will support the creation of a marker on the Northwest corner of Venice and Lincoln.
Sincerely, Luz Maria Napoles

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